CHURCHILL INFANTRY TANK
MkIII ARMAMENT DAMAGE RANGE AMMO
blank 57mm 6pdr MkV L/50 tank gun 11d6+3/1y AP or 9d6/2y HE 600 84
blank 2 x 7.92mm BESA MG (hull, coaxial) 2d6+4 110 9450
MkVII ARMAMENT DAMAGE RANGE AMMO
blank 75mm MkV L/36.5 tank gun 10d6+4/1y AP or 10d6/2y HE 600 84
blank 2 x 7.92mm BESA MG (hull, coaxial) 2d6+4 110 9450

Based on First World War tactics, British tanks were designed either as "cruiser" tanks, which were fast and maneuverable, or "infantry" tanks, slow but heavily-armored to support infantry attacks. Designed before the war, the early Churchill models were plagued with mechanical problems until the appearance of the MkIII, to which previous models were modified towards. The Churchill was not put into the field during the Dieppe raid of August 1942. Churchill MkIIIs served in the Tunisian campaign of 1942-43, and some were supplied to the Soviet Union through lend-lease.

Production of the Churchill was suspended in 1943, as the British abandoned the idea of cruiser vs infantry tanks, and settled on building cruiser tanks to fill all roles. The success of the Churchill in Tunisia resulted in the MkVII model, which had more armor and a larger gun. The Churchill MkVII was the main infantry tank of British and Commonwealth forces for the rest of the war. A close-support tank, the MkVIII, armed with a 95mm howitzer (11d6/2y HE damage) instead of the 75mm gun, was also important during the Italian and European campaigns.


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