blank cell Steyr-Solothurn S1-100 Submachine Gun
NO PICTURE AVAILABLE CALIBER 9mm Para
DAMAGE 1d10
RATE OF FIRE 2-20 per round
MAGAZINE CAPACITY 32 rounds
ACTION selective-fire
LOADING magazine
BASE RANGE 20 yards
MALFUNCTION 98-96-75
YEAR 1930
COMBAT USE: Bolivia, Chile, El Salvador, Germany, Japan, Portugal, Uruguay, and many European police agencies

Both the Austrian Steyr-Daimler-Puch company and the Swiss Solothurn company were controlled by the German Rheinmetall AG during the 1930s and early 1940s. Louis Stange of Rheinmetall had designed a submachine gun which was developed to production stage at Solothurn and then put into production at Steyr as the S1-100. The S1-100 had a wooden stock and a progressive trigger offering single shots and bursts. It fed from a magazine inserted from the left. The weapon was offered in a number of chamberings. In 1932 it was adopted in 9mm Steyr by the Austrian police as the M.32. Two years later the Austrian Army took it in 9mm Mauser as the M.34. Both types were taken over by the German police in 1938 as the MP34(), initially retaining the non-standard calibers. In 1939 production switched to 9mm Parabellum, and all of those were delivered to the German security forces as the MP34(). Many of the older guns were converted to the German standard chambering.

Very small numbers of S1-100 in 7.63mm Mauser were delivered to China and Japan. It was popular in South America, customers including and Uruguay, probably all in 7.63mm Mauser and likely only in small numbers. Portugal adopted it in 7.65mm Luger as the M/938. Several European police agencies also adopted the S1-100 and used the weapon in much the same way North American police used the 12-gauge pump-action shotgun.


DELTA GREEN 1939-1945 : EQUIPMENT : SUBMACHINE GUNS